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I consider 2012 one of the best years of my career. Lots of challenging work, some exhibitions abroad, opportunities to teach and the most amazing assignments a photographer like me could only dream of five years ago. I have to thank Erwin Romulo and Esquire Philippines for helping me make my dreams come true. Thank you and congratulations Esquire Philippines!

Check out the anniversary issue:

and my coverage of the DAZZLING Esquire ball on SPOT.Ph

© Tammy David

A senator, a farmer and a gentleman.

Because he is pure awesome

Greg Brillantes for Esquire Philippines September 2012

© Tammy David

One of my future plans is to be a photo editor. People ask me about it and think I do a lot of retouching. It’s more than that. I guess to know more about it, I suggest you read Aphotoeditor.com it’s a great source of information.

For those who want to be curators, buy a copy of GARAGE Magazine’s August 2012 issue. They recently featured Yuchengo Museum‘s Jeannie Javelosa. She is the resident curator as well as a columnist, writer, creative strategist, entrepreneur and yoga instructor among other things. PHEW. Anyway read the interview and check out the photo by yours truly.

© Tammy David

Thank you Jeannie Javelosa, Yuchengco Museum and September Mahino of Garage Magazine.

I had the pleasure of photographing renowned local fashion designer and educator Gerry Katigbak and his Manila apartment. I admire professionals like Geryy who decide to teach to pass on the knowledge to the new generation of craftsmen.

© Tammy David

Thank you to Gerry, Geolette Esguerra of Metro. Check out the article in this month’s issue of METRO Magazine.

© Tammy David

PHILSTAR: The word according to Greg Brillantes by Tanya Lara

Originally posted on LightBox:

We’re accustomed to seeing Olympic athletes in their elements: gymnast Gabby Douglas tumbling across the balance beam; runner Lolo Jones mid-hurdle on the track. But in his portrait series of gold-medal hopefuls for TIME’s 2012 Olympics special issue, Martin Schoeller shows three U.S. team members—Douglas, Jones and swimmer Ryan Lochte—whose passion for sport isn’t contained by training center walls.

(For daily coverage of the 2012 Games, visit TIME’s Olympics blog)

In Des Moines, Iowa, where Gabby Douglas has lived since 2010 with a host family to train with legendary Olympic coach Liang Chow, Schoeller met a young athlete who was a role model in the gym and in her home. “It was inspiring to see Gabby with the family who has taken her in so that she can pursue her dream of being an Olympic athlete,” the photographer said. In one picture, Douglas is posed in a full split…

View original 366 more words

You know it’s time  you need an assistant when the subject of your portrait, the brilliant and respected Rep. Angara no less, volunteers to carry half of your equipment. What a gentleman.

© Tammy David

To know more about Rep. Juan Edgardo “Sonny” Angara, buy the July 2012 issue of Esquire Philippines or follow him on twitter. I’m voting for him on 2013.

Many thanks to Jonty and Esquire Philippines.

I am happy to announce my story “Crown and Country” will be part of this wonderful group exhibition in London. Friends in the area, it would mean the world to me if you guys drop by. Thank you


Insider, Outsider? 
Photography that challenges perceptions of the developing world
3-22 July 2012
Daily 10am-6pm (free admission)
Guardian Gallery, Kings Place, London N1 9GU 

A. M. Ahad, Bangladesh
Aaron Sosa, Panama/Venezuela
Adolphus Opara, Nigeria
Andrés Lofiego, Argentina
Andrew Esiebo, Nigeria
Daniel Patiño Flor, Ecuador
Dominic Sansoni, Sri Lanka
Fabrice Monteiro, Benin
Farzana Hossen, Bangladesh
Kishor Sharma, Nepal
Màrio Macilau, Mozambique
M. Anisul Hoque, Bangladesh
Neo Ntsoma, South Africa
Samar Hazboun, Palestine
Shadi Ghadirian, Iran
Shankar Sarkar, India
Tammy David, Philippines

Majority World Photo Agency is an innovative social enterprise that works with talented photographers from the developing world. We specialise in high quality imagery that provides unique insights into local cultures, development issues, environments and contemporary lifestyles in these diverse continents. We also work with clients to commission assignments with our experienced photographers who understand the language, the culture, and the locality because it is their own.www.majorityworld.com

Tuesday was one of those days I felt lucky I was a photographer.

My friend Bea asked me to document a fashion show by Furne One, a renowned Dubai-based international fashion designer who is in town for some sort of homecoming event presented by MEGA Magazine. I read one too many write ups about this famous Cebuano in the past and all were praise for his craftsmanship, creativity and especially humility, a quality I admire in anyone. I was very eager to take this assignment despite the lack of preparation (I really need to buy a zoom lens STAT) and a canceled workout session (I have a fitness deadline) because I got a backstage pass. As I mentioned in the earlier post, I love shooting backstage and I consider it one of the perks of the job.

I’ve shot for  some time now but to this day, I always feel nervous before an assignment. Believe me I still sweat buckets before any assignment ranging from a regular event coverage to a portrait sitting. There is that fear that something will go wrong. I realized being paranoid keeps me alert. I think in a way it’s good for me because when the time comes I will start being comfortable with assignments is the time I will start producing substandard work.

After the nth time I checked my camera settings, did some test shots during the technical rehearsal and placed a chair to mark my spot in the tiny press box (I left my tripod in the trunk.), I was able to relax and felt ready for the show. What I wasn’t ready for was what I saw backstage where Furne One’s team was working. I was AWESTRUCK. I had the same feeling the first time  I saw INFRA by Richard Mosse when I entered the tiny function room where the Team was preaparing. The scenes were captivating that I needed a full minute to take everything in before I started shooting.

Furne One’s collection, inspired by Mata Hari, was spellbinding from the gowns to the accessories. Seeing his team in action, sewing the headpieces and making sure not a stud was loose convinced me Cebuanos will rule the world. The collection reportedly took four years and costs P 7,000,000.000 ($170,000 US). I never doubted that bit of information since the place was bursting with gold thread, pearls, crystals and all kinds of studs that made me feel like I was inside the Central Bank vault only with lots of beautiful people. I shot for about two and a half hours until it was time for the models to hit the runway. Like I said, assignments like last Tuesday’s reminded me of how lucky I am as a photographer. It gave me an opportunity to witness talented people work under pressure to the extent I questioned myself if I have pushed myself in my profession. I have to stop right here before I start using cliché phrases and really cheesy adjectives. I’ll leave everything to the photos and I hope the readers will enjoy it.

© Tammy David

Many many thanks to Bea Ledesma of Ystyle, Philippine Star, Ces of MMPI and Furne One’s team. Please buy a copy of today’s YSTYLE with photos by yours truly.

Read Bea Ledesma’s interview with Furne One:

The one to beat: Furne One returns with a grand solo show By Bea J. Ledesma (The Philippine Star) Updated June 15, 2012

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